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Gayatri Iyer's 'Life's Macchiato' brings forth the taste of young India

Sayoni Aiyar |

First published: December 13, 2014, 3:52 PM IST | Updated: December 13, 2014
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Gayatri Iyer's 'Life's Macchiato' brings forth the taste of young India
However, the young author- and therefore, the reader- has been let down hugely by the editing or rather, the lack of it.

New Delhi: A collection of short stories, 'Life's Macchiato' has all the energy, enthusiasm, and freshness of its twenty-something first-time author. She takes her readers to diverse places and diverse personalities, from a woman struggling with an abusive marriage to young college students and prodigal professionals.

My favourite one is the third one, the story of Karthik who has built a life for himself in the US but realises the deep pull of his roots when he returns to Chennai for his dying father. It's actually a turning point in the book for me as a reader too. The first two stories, frankly, didn't do much for me, and I was about to give up on the book when I reached Story No 3. Gayatri Iyer keeps up the pace after that, with thought-provoking slice-of-life narratives. The only other story I felt was out of place was 'Journey of A One-Rupee Coin' which seemed straight out of a high school English exam paper. The rest all had their own sweetness though, and I finished the last one, 'Comedy Of Errors', with a smile.

I found the title of the book a bit of a mouthful, and I am glad there is an explanation given. The blurb on the back says the book describes life's flavours, like 'each layer of a macchiato (that) has a distinct colour and flavour.' A book then, that speaks of, and to, the young, urban, smartphone-toting, coffee-drinking demographic.

However, the young author- and therefore, the reader- has been let down hugely by the editing or rather, the lack of it. Errors in spelling and grammar consistently trip up the reading, which is a pity, because this is a new voice coupled with a fertile imagination. If young 'metroliterates' are the flavour of the season, this is an author to keep an eye on.

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