GET Stock QuotesNews18 APP
News18 English
Powered by cricketnext logo
»
1-min read

Gayatri Iyer's 'Life's Macchiato' brings forth the taste of young India

However, the young author- and therefore, the reader- has been let down hugely by the editing or rather, the lack of it.

Sayoni Aiyar |

Updated:December 13, 2014, 3:52 PM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Gayatri Iyer's 'Life's Macchiato' brings forth the taste of young India
However, the young author- and therefore, the reader- has been let down hugely by the editing or rather, the lack of it.

New Delhi: A collection of short stories, 'Life's Macchiato' has all the energy, enthusiasm, and freshness of its twenty-something first-time author. She takes her readers to diverse places and diverse personalities, from a woman struggling with an abusive marriage to young college students and prodigal professionals.

My favourite one is the third one, the story of Karthik who has built a life for himself in the US but realises the deep pull of his roots when he returns to Chennai for his dying father. It's actually a turning point in the book for me as a reader too. The first two stories, frankly, didn't do much for me, and I was about to give up on the book when I reached Story No 3. Gayatri Iyer keeps up the pace after that, with thought-provoking slice-of-life narratives. The only other story I felt was out of place was 'Journey of A One-Rupee Coin' which seemed straight out of a high school English exam paper. The rest all had their own sweetness though, and I finished the last one, 'Comedy Of Errors', with a smile.

I found the title of the book a bit of a mouthful, and I am glad there is an explanation given. The blurb on the back says the book describes life's flavours, like 'each layer of a macchiato (that) has a distinct colour and flavour.' A book then, that speaks of, and to, the young, urban, smartphone-toting, coffee-drinking demographic.

However, the young author- and therefore, the reader- has been let down hugely by the editing or rather, the lack of it. Errors in spelling and grammar consistently trip up the reading, which is a pity, because this is a new voice coupled with a fertile imagination. If young 'metroliterates' are the flavour of the season, this is an author to keep an eye on.

Also Watch

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp

Live TV