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'Karachi, You're Killing Me' describes extremes of Pakistan

Vivek Tejuja | http://vivekisms

Updated: April 21, 2014, 6:44 PM IST
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'Karachi, You're Killing Me' describes extremes of Pakistan
At the heart of the novel is, Ayesha Khan, female reporter in Karachi, who despises the elite and has no choice but to cover them for her pieces as well.

There are very few satirical writers left in the world, I think. Or maybe I have not heard enough of them. So when I stumble on something interesting - satirical, with a good plot and hilarious at the same time, I know that I have struck gold. For a reader, nothing is more gratifying than reading something which fulfills and satisfies at the same time. 'Karachi, You're Killing Me' is one of those books. You immediately take a liking to it and that is that.

Saba Imtiaz's first book, 'Karachi, You're Killing Me' is a romp of a read and when I say romp - I mean it in the sense of it being fast-paced, funny, tongue-in-cheek and describing the extremes of Pakistan - from the elite to the not-so elite to the middle class that hangs in the balance.

Books about Pakistan always leave me wanting to know more about the country. It is almost like the need to know how the brother country has shaped and what lies ahead of them: Is it as different? Is it that similar? As I reader, I am left clamouring for more.

At the heart of the novel is, Ayesha Khan, a single, female reporter in Karachi, who despises the elite and has no choice but to cover them for her pieces as well. Her assignments range from covering a bomb site to interviewing her boss's niece, who is a cup-cake designer. Besides this, she has her own problems to take care of.

Imtiaz, very cleverly brings to her readers: Karachi: In all its splendour and sometimes not so. She speaks of the underbelly of Karachi and what it takes sometimes to survive in a city like this. Ayesha is almost caught between two worlds and yet is sorted in her head. She is the kind of character that takes her chances and does it without thinking twice.

The writing also is like this - almost semi-autobiographical in nature. It is most certainly not apologetic and Imtiaz says what she has to without making any bones about it. Saba Imtiaz, according to me, is one of the most promising writers to have come out of Pakistan in recent times and I for one cannot wait to read her next book.

Vivek Tejuja works at Flipkart and loves to recommend books.

First Published: April 21, 2014, 6:44 PM IST
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