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10 Things that Happen in Every Dan Brown Novel

Pathikrit Sanyal | News18.com

First published: September 29, 2016, 11:43 AM IST | Updated: September 29, 2016
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10 Things that Happen in Every Dan Brown Novel
Time for Langdon to retire.

The author who took the world by fire with three amazing novels and 3 highly mediocre ones, Dan Brown is soon to be back again with a new to-be-bestseller. Brown's new upcoming novel Origin is yet another adventure for Robert Langdon, a symbology professor at Harvard who often finds himself in sticky situations.

Introduced in Angels and Demons, and taken to new heights in The Da Vinci Code Brown has milked the popularity of Langdon's character dry over a course of 4 novels and is soong going to beat that dead horse again in the new one.

While growing up, Dan Brown novels were actually fun to read. They seemed intelligent and fast paced and to a certain degree, unputdownable. But that is no longer the case. The Lost Symbol was a bad collage of his Dan Brown cliches, and Inferno was just as bad, if not worse. The ten things you will find in every Robert Langdon adventure are:

1. Langdon gets a phone call to meet an enigmatic/famous person. And mostly it is a call that catches him completely off guard.

2. The caller asks Langdon to reach a destination that is far from his home.

3. When he reaches there, he finds out the enigmatic/famous person is in deep trouble.

4. His troubles have something to do with a mysterious cult. Always.

5. He uses his Harvard Symbology Professor skillset and finds out everything about that cult (which no one has been able to do from the beginning of time. But Langdon is boss).

6. There is always a damsel in distress who needs Langdon's shoulder to cry on.

7. Langdon ultimately saves the day, gains nirvana and keeps it to himself.

8. Just like Roger Murtaugh from the Lethal Weapon series, Langdon swears never to do this again, because he's really, too old for this shit.

9. All of this happens in 48-72 hours.

10. Plethora of art/architecture details that gets annoying after the first two books.

The reason why this happened is Robert Langdon's international popularity seemed to have gotten to the author's head and just like Chetan Bhagat, Adam Sandler, Salman Khan etc, Brown seems to operate under the notion "if it ain't broke, why fix it?"

Still, there is no denying that no matter how bad his books have become or are becoming with each new novel, we are all going to devour the next one in hopes that it'll be as good as Angels and Demons or Deception Point

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