GET Stock QuotesNews18 APP
News18 English

SPONSORS

Powered by cricketnext logo
»
1-min read

International Travel to The US Dropped in 2016

The National Travel and Tourism Office said that the US received 75.6 million international visitors last year, marking a 2.4 percent drop compared to 2015.

AFP Relaxnews

Updated:July 21, 2017, 10:35 AM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
International Travel to The US Dropped in 2016
International travel to the US declined in 2016. (Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ LeoPatrizi/ Istock.com)
New statistics released this week show that international travel to the US dropped in 2016, with nearly two million fewer visitors traveling to the country compared to the year before.

According to the National Travel and Tourism Office, the US received 75.6 million international visitors last year, marking a 2.4 percent drop compared to 2015.

Take neighboring Canada and Mexico out of the equation -- among two of America's biggest markets -- and that figure drops two percent to 49.7 million.

The biggest decline in international visits came from Brazil, which saw a 24 percent drop throughout 2016 compared to 2015.

Bucking the downward trend were China and South Korea, which posted a 15 percent and 12 percent spike in travel to the US respectively.

The figures point to a steady decline in international travel to the US.

Data from travel analysis firm ForwardKeys also showed that bookings to the US fell nearly 7 percent in late January compared to the same period last year.

The report traced the decline back to President Donald Trump's travel ban and the after-effects dubbed "The Trump Slump."

But along with the Muslim-majority countries affected by the initial travel ban, the US also lost travelers from Western Europe and the Asia Pacific region earlier this year, with bookings down 14 percent.

Meanwhile, statistics from the national tourism office report also showed that international travel to the US was down slightly in December 2016, compared to the same period in 2015, owing to drops in visits from Mexico (down 10 percent), the UK (6 percent) and Japan (4 percent).

Helping to offset the decrease, however, were China and Korea, which posted a 14 and 10 percent increase in travel to the US in December last year.

The report also shows the divide between business and pleasure: The majority of visitors from Latin America -- notably Argentina, Venezuela and Ecuador -- for example, visited the US for pleasure, while around 21 percent of visits from Germany, India and the Netherlands represented business travel to the US.

Overall, about 82 percent of overseas visits to the US represented pleasure, while 14 percent of visits were attributed to business travel.
Read full article
Next Story
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp

Live TV