Cricket Australia Sets Testosterone Limit for Transgender Players

Cricket Australia unveiled new guidelines on Thursday (August 8) to ensure transgender players can take part in the game at the highest levels.

Cricket Australia Sets Testosterone Limit for Transgender Players

Sydney: Cricket Australia unveiled new guidelines on Thursday (August 8) to ensure transgender players can take part in the game at the highest levels.

The policy sets out a testosterone limit for transgender and gender-diverse players who want to play for state and national women's teams.

"It doesn't make any sense that today, people are discriminated against, harassed or excluded, because of who they are," Cricket Australia chief executive Kevin Roberts said in a statement.

To be eligible for elite women's teams, the players must show a testosterone concentration of less than 10 nanomoles per litre over at least 12 months. They must also be able to demonstrate their elected gender is consistent with how they are living their lives on a daily basis.

The move more closely aligns Australia to the International Cricket Council's gender diversity guidelines. Cricket Australia's policy also provides guidance to community clubs, supporting grassroots cricketers to compete as the gender with which they identify.

The guidelines cover everything from victimisation to privacy and providing suitable facilities, as well as the collection of personal information. Transgender participation in sport has proved a thorny issue with some prominent stars, including tennis great Martina Navratilova, voicing disquiet.

Australian legend and current Cricket New South Wales board member Alex Blackwell, the proud holder of a staggering 251 national caps and an LGBTI advocate, has more recently played an integral role in the development of Cricket Australia's new Elite Cricket Policy and Guidelines for Community Cricket.

"Australian cricket has a really wonderful purpose, and that's to be Australia's favourite sport, and a sport for all Australians, and it's really important that we live by that, and we walk the talk," Blackwell was quoted as saying by cricket.com.au.

"These guidelines are very clearly about inclusivity, and that all people feel like cricket is a sport for them – that they would be safe and welcome to participate in the game, or to consume the game as a fan.

"I'm so proud of the work that Cricket Australia has done to get the Trans and Gender Diverse Inclusion Policy in place. It's taken six long months to get it done and we thought it was really, really important that trans and gender diverse people participate in the creation of that policy, so I'm very proud to say that that has happened.

"My friend and teammate Erica James has been a part of this policy development because she has a lived experience, and one that I'm pleased to say has been a positive experience for her," Blackwell added.

(With inputs from AFP)



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3 New Zealand 3716 116
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