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Pink Ball Can’t be Any Worse Than What the Red ball has Been for Test Cricket: Shane Warne

Shane Warne (R)

Shane Warne (R)

Shane Warne now believes it is high time that the traditional red ball should be swapped for the pink one for every match.

Former Australian leg spin legend Shane Warne not only brought leg spin from a dusty closet, but he made it fashionable again. Considered as one of the most successful spinners of all time, Warne is among the most elite cricket greats of the century. However, the spin wizard now believes it is high time that the traditional red ball should be swapped for the pink one for every match.

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The argument of the colour of the ball is not new and the conundrum has many divided opinions. However, Warne double downed to argue that the current pink Kookaburra ball should be the choice in all Test matches, irrespective of whether played during day or night.

Warne said that the International Cricket Council (ICC) should regulate the pink ball for all Test matches as the red ball has done its time and is struggling to make an impact in the long format of the game. Even though Warne took all of his 708 Test wickets with the traditional red ball, he’s been very vocal about its declining potency and has long argued that it no longer offers the bowlers enough assistance.

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The 51-year-old, who is currently on a commentary assignment for Fox Sports, said, "I’ve been saying this for the last few years. I believe the pink ball should be used in all Test matches. Day games, not just day-night games." Speaking on Fox Cricket’s The Big Break, he said, "I think the pink ball, you can see it easier, the crowd can see it easier," adding, "it generally does more than the red ball and it looks fantastic on TV."

He also explained that the traditional red ball doesn’t swing much and "doesn’t do anything and goes soft after 25 overs." However, he made an exception for the Dukes ball in England, as it was the only red ball across the world that offered something for bowlers.

"The pink ball can’t be any worse than what the red ball has been for Test cricket. We haven’t seen swing, we haven’t seen seam. Absolutely nothing," he added.

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The first pink ball Test match was played in 2015 between Australia and New Zealand in Adelaide. Ever since, the pink ball Test at Adelaide has become one of the prominent fixtures on the cricket calendar.

Australia have hosted most day-night Tests, with eight played at home including the ongoing match against India this year.