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Third Ashes Test Cleared of Spot-fixing Allegations by ICC

File image of Steve Smith and Joe Root. (AP Image)

File image of Steve Smith and Joe Root. (AP Image)

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has said that it was unable to find any evidence in the spot fixing claims that surfaced ahead of the the third Test of the Ashes series in Perth, last December.

New Delhi: The International Cricket Council (ICC) has said that it was unable to find any evidence in the spot fixing claims that surfaced ahead of the the third Test of the Ashes series in Perth, last December.

'The Sun' had reported that underground bookmakers from India had offered to sell undercover reporters from the newspaper information about spot-fixing in the third Test between Australia and England, which starts in Perth on Thursday. The newspaper also said it had passed all the evidence to the International Cricket Council, who said they would be investigated by its Anti-Corruption Unit.

However, the ICC have now issued a statement saying that they have concluded their investigation and have found no wrongdoing on the part of players or support staff.

"We have carried out an extensive global investigation with anti-corruption colleagues from Member countries based on the allegations in The Sun and the material they shared with us. I am satisfied that there is no evidence to suggest any match has been corrupted by the individuals in the investigation nor is there any indication that any international players, administrators or coaches have been in contact with the alleged fixers," said Alex Marshall, the ICC General Manager of the Anti-Corruption Unit.

Spot-fixing occurs when corrupt players agree to manipulate part of a match by, for example, bowling a wide on a particular delivery or ensuring a particular run rate. The corruption does not usually affect the overall outcome of the match but gamblers in the know can use the information to beat the betting market.

The underground bookmakers had told the reporters that they had previously manipulated matches in the Indian Premier League and were also targeting Australia's Twenty20 Big Bash League.

"I will give you work in Ashes Test. Session runs. Maybe day one, two, three. We have two session work, one session costs Rs 60 lakh, two sessions Rs 120 lakh," the bookie said in the sting done by the newspaper.

One of the bookies even claimed to have worked on the scam with former and current internationals including a World Cup-winning all-rounder. They said they liaised with a fixer in Australian cricket known as "The Silent Man". No Australia or England players were named as being involved.