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Female Drivers Can Suffer Serious Injuries More Than Men During a Car Accident

Image for representation.

Image for representation.

Eight years after the first findings suggested that women are 47 per cent more likely to sustain serious injuries in car crash, the figures have only increased.

Anirudh SK
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In 2011 a study conducted by the University of Virginia for applied Biomechanics revealed that female drivers involved in car crashes were more 47 per cent more prone to serious injuries or death than their male counterparts in the event of an accident.

The figures are equally shocking in terms of moderate injuries with the likelihood compared to men increasing to 71 per cent. This study 9 years ago was the first time this dangerous motoring gender divide in-car safety had ever been identified.


Eight years later in 2019, the picture remains quite the same. A new paper published by the University of Virginia research team has now found out that the odds of a female sustaining serious injury or death is an alarming 73 per cent which is 26 per cent more than 2011. Around 31,000 motorists were analysed between 1998 and 2015 showing that there has been no progress over the past 10 or so years in equalling the gender danger gap during car accidents.

The same findings are supported by research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The increased risks to females when in a car crash were broken down by body part. In some cases, such as leg injuries, females are an astounding8 0% more likely to get injured than their male counterparts during a car crash.

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