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New Evidence Suggests Cause of Ethiopian Airlines Crash Can be Similar to Lion Air Plane Crash

Investigators have found a piece of a stabilizer in the wreckage of an Ethiopian jet with the trim set in an unusual position similar to that of a Lion Air plane that crashed last year.

Reuters

Updated:March 15, 2019, 2:05 PM IST
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New Evidence Suggests Cause of Ethiopian Airlines Crash Can be Similar to Lion Air Plane Crash
Ethiopian Federal policemen stand at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu, southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. (Image: Reuters)
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Investigators have found a piece of a stabilizer in the wreckage of an Ethiopian jet with the trim set in an unusual position similar to that of a Lion Air plane that crashed last year, two sources familiar with the matter said. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Wednesday fresh information from the wreckage of the Ethiopian crash, which killed all 157 people on board, and newly refined data about its flight path indicated some similarities with the Lion Air disaster.

Both accidents involved Boeing Co 737 MAX planes. The FAA and other global regulators grounded the fleet after the Ethiopian crash. The FAA has not publicly released details of its findings from the Ethiopian wreckage.

The trim position of the stabilizer, which moves the jet's horizontal tail, could help determine whether or not it was set nose down for a steep dive. The two sources, who declined to be named, said part of a stabilizer found in the Ethiopian wreckage was in a unusual position similar to the Lion Air plane.

Some media organisations, including Bloomberg, had earlier reported the discovery of part of the stabilizer.

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| Edited by: Arjit Garg
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