Powered by cricketnext logo
»
5-min read

Suzuki GSX-S750 First Ride Track Review: Keeping the K5 Engine Rumbling, in Style

The Suzuki GSX-S750 has been launched at a price tag of Rs 7.45 lakh and is the second motorcycle to assembled in India by Suzuki after the Hayabusa.

Manav Sinha | News18.com@manav_sinha

Updated:April 26, 2018, 4:35 PM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Suzuki GSX-S750 First Ride Track Review: Keeping the K5 Engine Rumbling, in Style
The 2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 has been ridden at the Buddh International Circuit. (Photo: Suzuki Motorcycles)
Suzuki Motorcycles India has launched the all-new GSX-S750 in India at a price tag of Rs 7.45 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi). This is their first middleweight capacity street naked offering in the Indian market and they first showcased this model at the 2018 Auto Expo. The importance of this product and the expectations that Suzuki has with this can be guessed by the fact that the S750 is the second motorcycle which will be assembled here in India, after the Suzuki Hayabusa. And rightly so, the middleweight street naked motorcycle segment has seen a lot of action in India lately with a host of motorcycles making their way on our roads (more on that later). We had a chance to clock a few flying laps at the Buddha International Circuit with the GSX-S750. Here are our key takeaways.

Watch Video

 
In order to understand the Suzuki GSX-S750 a bit better, you need to look at its elder sibling for a moment - the Suzuki GSX-S1000. And to understand that, you’ll have to go all the way back to 2005. That is when Suzuki’s fully-faired offerings – the Suzuki GSX-R1000 and the Suzuki GSX-R750 were given a lot of updates, prime amongst them was a redesigned engine termed K5. The motorcycle was loved by many and the bike rose quickly on the list of recommendations for a lot of riders and the biggest reason for that was just how good the K5 engine was. Fast forward to 2015 and Suzuki launched the GSX-S1000 in India. This bike used the same K5 engine from almost a decade ago and was retuned for better mid-range power and torque delivery. We tested the bike and fell in love with it.

Now, for 2018, Suzuki is betting on the GSX-S750. This also takes the K5 engine first seen on the 2005 Suzuki GSX-R750, which has also been tuned for stronger mid-range power and torque delivery. So, there’s a lot in common between all these four motorcycles. Three of them have proved to be an absolutely great value for money offering. The pressure is on the S750 and the expectations are higher than ever.

Suzuki-GSX-S750Suzuki GSX-S750 has styling similar to the GSX-S1000. (Photo: Siddharth Safaya/News18.com)

With all this out of the way, let’s come back to the track experience. The moment we fired up the new S750, there was the familiar Suzuki in-line four-cylinder growl. But, it was louder than I expected. Turns out, Suzuki has fitted a bigger airbox for a sweet intake sound along with a growly exhaust. Which, simply put, is a beautiful audible experience for those listening to this bike pass by at high RPM as well as the rider. The S750 is what one could call a screamer, given the right set of tools.

Buddh International Circuit, or BIC in short, is a big track meant for big bikes at big speeds and the S750 is not shy to punch above its weight. With a power output of about 114 hp and 81 Nm of torque, it is on the faster side with 225 km/h being indicated on the back straight pretty much every time. But it was not how fast the bike went that was impressive but how it went there. The power is spread evenly across the RPM band and the bike is ready to sprint in most of the scenarios. If you dare to do so, you’ll have the safety net of traction control watching your back. It is adjustable to three stages and can be turned off altogether as well. There’s also ABS which cannot be turned off.

Suzuki-GSX-S750-Instrument-ClusterSuzuki GSX-S750's instrument cluster is easy to read. (Photo: Manav Sinha/News18.com)

The Suzuki GSX-S750 dons specially built Bridgestone tyres which do not disappoint. The front KYB upside down forks and the rear suspension are preload adjustable and even if you accelerate hard out of the corners, the motorcycle comfortable squats down and leaps all the way to the next gear. Another advantage of using the K5 engine for Suzuki was that it has an almost vertical mounting position which, along with the newly designed swingarm, helps them to keep the wheelbase compact. This makes the motorcycle light on its feet and extremely fun at chicanes. The radially mounted Nissin callipers at the front coupled with twin 320mm discs also feel progressive and offer a good bite.

By now, you should be seeing a trend. All of these factors make you want to push the motorcycle harder the next time you go around the same corner but you keep doing so and some chinks in the armour begin to show. Firstly, it is a street naked motorcycle design which is meant to give the rider a relatively upright stance as compared to a fully-faired motorcycle like the Suzuki GSX-R1000. The wind bursts is a reality you will have to deal with and then there is the absence of a slipper clutch and the ABS which is a bit too intrusive when you are braking hard. This makes the rear end of the motorcycle judder and swivel while you are setting it up for a corner. And to wrap it up, the gearbox felt a bit clunky during aggressive upshifts.

Suzuki-GSX-S750-RearSuzuki GSX-S750 from the back. (Photo: Manav Sinha/News18.com)

But then, perhaps, this shows the biggest trait of the motorcycle – it is friendly and forgiving. The motorcycle invites you to push it to the limit with open arms and this can sometimes lead to mistakes. But here’s the thing, if you do happen to make a mistake on this one, it will not bite your head off. Yet, it still packs some serious punch.

The overall feedback, the smooth throttle response and the refined engine make it a great motorcycle for learning your way around a race track. And at the end of the day, it also seems like a sensible choice for street and highway riding.

Suzuki-GSX-S750-GraphicsSuzuki GSX-S750 comes with aggressive new body graphics. (Photo: Manav Sinha/News18.com)

At the end of the day, with a price tag of Rs 7.45 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi), the Suzuki GSX-S750 has proved itself to be a great value for money motorcycle at least as a street bike which can be taken on the track. How does it behave in everyday riding scenario? For that, we have to wait for our road test. But, if this bike gets it right (which it seems to be able to) then this motorcycle will also be right there with the likes of the other three motorcycle we mentioned at the start.

ridingSuzuki GSX-S750 in action at the Buddh Internaitonal Circuit. (Photo: Siddharth Safaya/News18.com)

Perhaps, a good way to keep the K5 engine alive and rumbling even in 2018.

Don't Miss: Ducati 959 Panigale Review

Also Watch

| Edited by: Manav Sinha
Read full article