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Astronomers Discover the Biggest Quasar from Early Universe Using Maunakea Observatories

Representative image / Reuters.

Representative image / Reuters.

This discovery has been made with the help of three Maunakea Observatories in Hawaii. These include W. M. Keck Observatory, the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab. The quasar is being referred to as Poniua’ena.

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Most massive quasar known in the early universe has been discovered by astronomers.

This discovery has been made with the help of three Maunakea Observatories in Hawaii. These include W. M. Keck Observatory, the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab.

This quasar is being referred to as Poniua’ena.

The name Poniua’ena in Hawaiian means, unseen spinning source of creation, surrounded with brilliance. Poniua’ena contains a monster black hole which has a mass equal to 1.5 billion suns.

According to a report published in phys.org, quasars are the most energetic objects in the universe.

Since the time these were first discovered researchers and astronomers have been working on knowing these to know when exactly did they first appear in terms of cosmic history.

As per the theory that is being currently believed, quasars are powered by supermassive black holes. For the unversed, black holes consume surrounding matter such as dust, gas stars, and as a result they emit huge amounts of energy, leading to luminosities known to outshine entire galaxies.

Jinyi Yang, a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory and lead author of the study said: "It's the earliest monster of this kind that we know of. The time was too short for it to grow from a small black hole to the enormous size we see. This discovery presents the biggest challenge yet for the theory of black hole formation and growth in the early universe."

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