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WATCH: Farmers are Blasting 'DJ Music' to Fight the Locust Attack in North India

Video tweeted by RAHUL SRIVASTAV
@upcoprahul.

Video tweeted by RAHUL SRIVASTAV @upcoprahul.

Farmers and locals have come up with novel ways to ward off the menace of locusts in India.

  • News18.com
  • Last Updated: May 28, 2020, 11:45 PM IST
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As India deals with a pandemic and the aftermath of disastrous cyclone Amphan, locust attack in the several states of India has become a reason for major concern for farmers and state governments alike.

After Jaipur woke up to the terrifying sight of thousands of locusts resting on their terraces and swarming around and damaging crops in Rajasthan and MP, swarms of locusts entered Uttar Pradesh's Jhansi district and could head towards Maharashtra's Ramtek city amid what is being described as the worst attack in 26 years.


"It is not a new problem and we had been facing it for a long time. This year, the locust attack is the worst in 26 years," said an official at the Faridabad-based Locust Warning Organisation (LWO), adding there is a coordinated effort to contain its spread. Locusts have earlier been confined to Rajasthan and Gujarat.

Read: In Worst Attack in Yrs, Locusts Swarm Maharashtra, UP, Punjab on Alert; Govt to Deploy Drones

To combat this, the farmers in UP have devised a unique method to keep the locusts away from their farms and crops. In a video tweeted by UP cop in Jhansi, Rahul Shrivastava, a vehicle fitted with DJ system can be seen blasting music to minimise the potential damage of the crop-hungry locusts.

Along with the video, the cop wrote, "DJ isn't just for dancing and parties but is also effective in warding off locusts. Everyone sees a new morning, you can make noise or bang utensils to do them away."



Here are some more videos of this unique technique that farmers have implemented.

Besides this, drones, tractors, and cars have been sent out to track the voracious pests and spray them with pesticides.


The locusts have already destroyed nearly 50,000 hectares (125,000 acres) of cropland.

"Eight to 10 swarms, each measuring around a square kilometre are active in parts of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh," the government's Locust Warning Organisation's deputy director K.L. Gurjar told AFP.

The local villagers have also been asked to make noise by beating 'thalis' and bursting crackers to drive the locust swarm away.

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