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Canadian Tourist Who Stole Objects from Pompeii in 2005 Returns Them Claiming They Bring Bad Luck

The ruins of Pompeii | Image credit: Reuters

The ruins of Pompeii | Image credit: Reuters

In her letter of apology, Nicole explained she stole the objects from the ancient Roman city of Pompeii when she was 21 and ‘wanted to have a piece of history that couldn’t be bought'.

A tourist who stole ancient objects from the archaeological site in Pompeii in 2005, has returned them stating they ‘bring bad luck’.

The Canadian woman identified only as Nicole, sent back two white mosaic tiles, two pieces of amphora vase and a piece of ceramic wall to the Archaeological Park in Pompeii, along with a note expressing regret for her actions. The woman stated that she doesn’t want to ‘pass on the curse’ on her family and friends, CNN reported.

In her letter of apology, she explained she visited the ancient Roman city of Pompeii when she was 21 and ‘wanted to have a piece of history that couldn’t be bought. Nicole added she was ‘young and dumb’ at that time. Since returning to Canada, she has suffered 15 years of misfortune and two bouts of breast cancer which have resulted in a double mastectomy and has also pushed her family towards financial trouble.

She wrote “I took a piece of history captured in a time with so much negative energy attached to it…People have died in such a horrible way that I took tiles related to the land of destruction”. Referring to Mount Vesuvius’ eruption in 78 AD, burying the residents of Pompeii with hot rock and volcanic ash.

In the letter Nicole apologised for her actions saying she was seeking ‘forgiveness from God’. She also hopes to rid herself of the bad luck, by stating ‘We are good people and I don’t want to pass this curse on to my family or children,’ she added.

The package also contained a letter from another Canadian couple who had stolen some artifacts during the same trip. It too had an accompanying apology letter.

“We took them without thinking of the pain and suffering these poor souls experienced during the eruption of Vesuvius and their terrible death,’ they wrote. They went on to add that they are sorry, and begged for forgiveness, reported Il Messagero.

According to the spokesperson of the Archaeological Park at Pompeii, over the years they have received hundreds of similar small artifacts stolen by visitors during a trip to Pompeii. Though not high in value, these returned objects have been put on display at the Pompeii Antiquarium, he added.

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