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Government Says No Clue on Who Made Aarogya Setu App, Twitter Responds with Memes

Government Says No Clue on Who Made Aarogya Setu App, Twitter Responds with Memes

The application, introduced in April, helps users identify whether they are at risk of the COVID-19 infection. It also provides people with important information, including ways to avoid coronavirus and its symptoms.

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Buzz Staff

The Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology and the National Informatics Centre on Wednesday said they do not have any information about the "creation" of the Aarogya Setu application. The app was promoted by the government to contain the spread of Covid-19. The Central Information Commission, terming the responses as "preposterous", issued a show-cause notice to the NIC to explain why a penalty under the Right to Information (RTI) Act not be slapped on it for "prima facie obstruction of information and providing an evasive reply".

The application helps users identify whether they are at risk of the COVID-19 infection. It also provides people with important information, including ways to avoid coronavirus and its symptoms. The app was introduced in April, soon after the lockdown, with the aim to help in contact tracing of Covid-19 cases. It was made compulsory for rail and air travellers and office goers among other groups.

The centre has come under attack over the lack of information about the developers of the Aarogya Setu app which used crucial data of users like location, etc. Amid all the backlash, jokes and memes over the issue also made an entry on social media. From the classic Hera Pheri memes to the latest Mirzapur templates, people cracked jokes about who actually created the app.

Days after the app was introduced, Congress leader Rahul Gandhi had termed it as a "sophisticated surveillance system". "The Aarogya Setu app is a sophisticated surveillance system, outsourced to a private operator, with no institutional oversight -- raising serious data security and privacy concerns. Technology can help keep us safe; but fear must not be leveraged to track citizens without their consent," he had said on Twitter.


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