Home» News» Buzz» Croatian Archeologists Discover Skeletons Buried in Ceramic Jars Dating Back to 4th Century
1-MIN READ

Croatian Archeologists Discover Skeletons Buried in Ceramic Jars Dating Back to 4th Century

Image for representation, Credits: Reuters

Image for representation, Credits: Reuters

The necropolis consisted of remains of 32 people some of who were buried in ceramic jars dating back to the late 4th and early 5th century AD.

In a fascinating new discovery, archaeologists in Croatia have unearthed a necropolis during their digging at the front ground of Radošević Palace on the island of Hvar. The necropolis consisted of remains of 32 people some of who were buried in ceramic jars dating back to the late 4th and early 5th century AD. According to the burials were extremely well preserved and many of them featured grave goods that included small ceramic jugs, coins, and utensils, Daily Mail Reported. A wall thought to be belonging to a late 5th-century settlement complete with a city gate was also found by the researchers during this excavation operation. Experts say that burial in ceramic jars was a very common practice in the older times, though it was reserved for infants and children. However, the ages of the remains found beneath the grounds of Radošević Palace are yet to be determined.

In total, the team found a total of 20 graves some of which considered multiple individuals. Talking about it in a statement, the researchers emphasized that the necropolis were extremely well preserved and this new discovery will be very valuable for studies to be conducted in the upcoming days.

They added that most of the tombs were decorated with ceramic jugs and lamps along with glass bottles, vessels, money and other utensils. The findings give a deep insight into old local antique ceramic production as well as trade links of that era.

Researchers believed that these findings were the most significant out of all the findings of antiques that they have come across in Hvar so far. It also gives the most detailed insight into the funeral rituals of that period.

RELATED NEWS

These latest discoveries were made during the two-month excavations that were carried at the site by archaeological consulting firm Kantharos – in preparation for the construction of a new library and reading room on the palace grounds.

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here

first published:June 22, 2021, 16:34 IST