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Did You Know? Staring at a Deep Red Light for 3 Minutes a Day Can Improve Eyesight

Did You Know? Staring at a Deep Red Light for 3 Minutes a Day Can Improve Eyesight

Staring at deep red light for three minutes a day can make significant improvements in declining eyesight.

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Most people’s eyesights are on the decline. Whether you want to credit your screen addiction or your lifestyle for this is up to you. What remains unchanged is the fact that your vision is weakening by the day.

According to a report published in the Science Daily (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/06/200629120241.htm), a study proves that standing in and staring at deep red light for three minutes a day can make significant improvements in declining eyesight.

The study has been carried out by UCL and has been published in the Journals of Gerontology. As per the report, this study can make home-based eye therapies more affordable.

Professor Glen Jeffery of UCL Institute of Ophthalmology who is the lead author of the study, said, "As you age your visual system declines significantly, particularly once over 40. Your retinal sensitivity and your colour vision are both gradually undermined, and with an ageing population, this is an increasingly important issue. To try to stem or reverse this decline, we sought to reboot the retina's ageing cells with short bursts of longwave light.”

A total of 24 people including 12 male and 12 females aged between 28 and 72, were recruited. These people did not have any ocular disease. Their eyes were also tested for the sensitivity of their rods and cones, for the benefit of the study.

The lead author also added, "Our study shows that it is possible to significantly improve vision that has declined in aged individuals using simple brief exposures to light wavelengths that recharge the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. The technology is simple and very safe, using a deep red light of a specific wavelength, that is absorbed by mitochondria in the retina that supply energy for cellular function. Our devices cost about £12 to make, so the technology is highly accessible to members of the public.”

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