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Ditching Your Car or Bike for a Bicycle Could Reduce 84% of CO2 Emissions on Road

Getty Images (AFP).

Getty Images (AFP).

According to the study published in Transportation Research, the overall C02 emissions of cyclists are 84% lower than those of people who never use a bicycle.

A scientific study shows that cyclists have a much smaller carbon footprint than other road users. On average, cyclists emit 84% less CO2 than a car or public transport users. According to the study published in Transportation Research, the overall C02 emissions of cyclists are 84% lower than those of people who never use a bicycle. To arrive at such a result, data on daily travel activities were collected in seven European cities, including London, Rome and Barcelona.

The results show that the daily CO2 emissions related to mobility are on average 3.2 kg of CO2 per person, 70% of which comes from car journeys alone. The more cycling becomes the norm, the more this average will drop drastically, resulting in healthier air to breathe and therefore a better quality of life in cities.

This study was based on a total of 10,722 participants in seven major European cities (London, Rome, Barcelona, Antwerp, Vienna, Zurich and Örebro).

Meanwhile, a recent led by scientists from the University of California in Irvine suggests that as the climate warms, lightning strikes will increase more than double, driving more wildfires and warming above the Arctic Circle. In 2019, the first-ever known lightning strike within 300 miles of the North Pole was reported by the National Weather Service, which is a rare case for Arctic Circle. However, in a new report published by the University of California, lightning strikes are likely to increase by 100 percent over the Arctic Circle by the end of the century as the climate continues to warm.

The study reveals how the Arctic’s weather would change as the planet continues to heat up, suggesting future weather reports from the Arctic could be similar to those coming from the south where lightning storms are a common phenomenon.

(With AFP inputs)

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