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'She's a Whooper': Diver Shares Photos of Close Encounter With Incredibly Large Bull Shark

Experts say bull sharks are the most dangerous species of sharks in the world. (Credit: John Moore/Instagram)

Experts say bull sharks are the most dangerous species of sharks in the world. (Credit: John Moore/Instagram)

In the picture that Moore shared on Instagram, the big bull shark can be seen sniffing the water surface in search of food. Because of its size, the shark appears to have dwarfed the other sharks.

John Moore, a freediving guide from Florida, United States, encountered a huge bull shark closely earlier this spring and shared a picture of the unusually round predator on his Instagram. While diving in Jupiter, Florida, Moore took a picture of the massive aquatic animal. “Most of our bulls are about 250 pounds and she was closer to 600 pounds,” Moore said while talking to USA Today.

In the picture that Moore shared on Instagram, the big bull shark can be seen sniffing the water surface in search of food. Because of its size, the shark appears to have dwarfed the other sharks.

The reason for the unusual size of the shark, according to Moore, was most likely that she was pregnant and close to giving birth. Moore told USA Today, “This is the correct timing for pregnant females to be having their pups.” However, he thinks one cannot be sure about the pregnancy of sharks by looking at their size.

55-year-old freediver Moore also likes to do underwater photography, and his Instagram feed is full of images of sharks taken by him. When his image of the huge bull shark was featured in the news, many people claimed to him that the shark looks bigger than it actually is because of the camera angle. Moore acknowledged their claim but assured that it was still massive. He recalls that the pregnant shark was not shy of his presence.

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According to experts, bull sharks are the most dangerous species of sharks in the world. Getting their name from their short, blunt snout, they have a tendency to hit their prey with their head, like bulls. Bull sharks thrive in warm and plain saltwater near populated shores. Normally, bull sharks do not eat humans for a meal, but these aggressive wanderers can attack people accidentally or out of curiosity.

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