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Double-trouble: US Woman Finds Twin-headed Snake Slithering in Her Home, Spooky Video Goes Viral

Image credits: Jeannie Wilson / Facebook.

Image credits: Jeannie Wilson / Facebook.

The double-headed snake was given to the local science centre where they identified it as a rate snake. They are named so because they mostly feed on mice and rats.

If you found a snake in your home, would you stop and think of funny names for it or run away as fast as you can? A woman in the US chose to do the former.

A rare two-headed snake was found by a North Carolina resident inside her house. The woman, Jeannie Wilson, spotted the baby snake in her sunroom, simply slithering about as if it belonged there.

She admitted that she was left “shocked” by the snake’s sudden appearance. She also estimated it must have been around a foot long. She called out for her family as soon as she spotted it near a table.

She called out for her son-in-law who was at some distance, she told WSOC-TV.

“I'm not crazy, guys. He's got two heads. When he got there, he said, 'He does have two heads, don't he?” she added.

She later uploaded a video featuring the snake, asking people if the snake should be set free into the wild or donated to someone who could help care for it in captivity. She definitely didn’t want it to be harmed or killed, she told Newsweek.

She captioned it, “OK Facebook... anybody out there know of a place that would take Double Trouble and care for him/her or should I turn it loose? It's not poisonous.”

In the video, the snake can be seen slithering about in a container.

The snake was given to the local science centre where they identified it as a rate snake. They are named so because they mostly feed on mice and rats. Some people in the United States even keep them as pets as they are non-venomous.

Due to its unique appearance, Wilson has named the intruder in her home as “double-trouble”. She elaborated that it was a family game night and the doors had been left open for some fresh air. Once people left, she was cleaning up in her sunroom where she found the reptile. She’d even tried to feed it but it wouldn’t eat.

According to herpetologists, two-headed snakes have a low rate of survival in the wild as they cannot decide which head would eat the prey or which direction to go.


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