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Ever Wondered What the Sunrise and Sunset Look from Space? Here You Go

Images shared by NASA astronaut Victor Glover
@AstroVicGlover.

Images shared by NASA astronaut Victor Glover @AstroVicGlover.

The post has been liked nearly 4K times. People responded with astonishment to the amazing sight in a flood of replies and retweets.

Sunset and sunrise photos are quite popular on social media. Taken at a beach as the sun sets across the horizon over blue water or clicked as it comes up between two lush mountains on a hill station, sunrises and sunsets are a great photographic opportunity for enthusiasts. But did you ever imagine what a sunset or sunrise looks like when you’re not on Earth? How would the sun exactly rise and set in the vast cosmos that we inhabit?

If you have ever been curious about it, seek no more. NASA astronaut Victor Glover will help you satiate your curiosity with the mesmerising images he took aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Sharing his photographic skill and space majesty on Twitter, he asked his followers if they can see a particular band of colours.

In his caption, the astronaut asked the netizens if they can spot the bands of colour, which reminded him of the scripture in Psalm 30. Below, he attached two images of the celestial beauty. In the first photograph, the sun is visible as a bright red glowing dot in the centre of a black background. A string of light runs horizontal to the glowing orb, cutting through it. It almost looks like a band of rainbow light reflected from a prism.

In the second picture, the sun is brighter than ever. It looks like an explosion of light so bright, it has no shape. The band here is bluer than the previous image and extremely shiny. Parts of the ISS are visible in the foreground of the image.

Have a look at this mesmerising capture:

The post has been liked nearly 4K times. People responded with astonishment to the amazing sight in a flood of replies and retweets. “Beautiful and profound quote and images! I'm very happy to accompany you, Victor! The world needs these doses of joy! Have a beautiful night full of light, love and peace! Good evening!,” said a Twitter user, while another commented, “Thank God for all of you up there and in the space program. Tracking your progress and work is one of the more uplifting things I've got going right now:).”

Are you wondering how the sun can set and rise in space when it’s always there in a fixed spot? It’s because the ISS is revolving around the Earth. It completes one orbit around the Earth every 90 minutes. The result, the astronauts aboard the ISS witness around 16 sunsets and sunrises every day.

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