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Genes Linked to Coronavirus Were Passed Down in Human DNA from Neanderthals

Image for representation.

Image for representation.

A mere eight percent of Europeans and four percent of East Asians carry it. This particular genome is not present in Africans.

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The coronavirus pandemic has entirely changed the functioning of the world. It is perhaps the only disease to have brought the world to a complete stand still. What is more surprising about this disease is the fact that no doctor, scientist, researcher has been able to find the exact cause of this disease.

According to The New York Times, a study has found out that a stretch of DNA linked to Covid-19 has been passed down from Neanderthals over a span of 60,000 years ago. As of now the particular segment is not known to the Scientists.

Joshua Akey, a geneticist at Princeton University who was not involved in the new study told the New York Times, "This interbreeding effect that happened 60,000 years ago is still having an impact today."

The study has found out that there has been a puzzling human history with respect to this particular genome spans six genes on Chromosome 3. Further, the study has also revealed that 63 percent of the people in Bangladesh carry at least one copy.

So far as other parts of the world are concerned, this genome is not found as much. A mere eight percent of Europeans and four percent of East Asians carry it. This particular genome is not present in Africans.

It must be noted especially at this point in time that the researchers are at a very initial stage of understanding as to why the lethal novel coronavirus has different impacts on different age groups and gender. They are also trying to understand why there is a bigger threat to the elderly or why men are more at risk as compared to women.

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