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Here's How a Child's Academic Success Depends on the Parents' Genes and Other Factors

The research’s findings might help policymakers make a timely intervention and improve academic outcomes.

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Updated:December 19, 2019, 9:52 PM IST
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Here's How a Child's Academic Success Depends on the Parents' Genes and Other Factors
Image for representation. (Image credits: Getty Images)

A new study has revealed the “socio-economic background” and genes differences of parents can determine the academic success of an individual.

The study has been conducted by the University of York in the UK, reported phys.org.

Researchers used data of 5,000 children born in the UK between 1994 and 1996 and arrived at the conclusion by examining different key stages of the children as well as their parents’ occupational status and educational qualification.

The report noted that children coming from affluent background and low inclination towards academics have a higher chance of making to university. While children having high genetic inclination towards education, but poor socio-economic condition might not get into a university.

The study reveals that 47 per cent children with a high genetic propensity for education, but a poor background make the cut in a university. In contrast to 62 per cent with a low genetic propensity for education but with parents who are more affluent.

The research’s findings might help policymakers make a timely intervention and improve academic outcomes.

Lead author of the study, Professor Sophie von Stumm from the Department of Education at the University of York, said, “Genetics and socioeconomic status capture the effects of both nature and nurture, and their influence is particularly dramatic for children at the extreme ends of distribution”.

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