News18»Buzz
3-MIN READ

Hostility and Cynicism is Not Good for Your Heart's Health, Says Study

Representative image.

Representative image.

Skeptical or cynical people tend to experience high-stress levels every single time, again and again, stressing the body more than regular people.

Turn that frown upside down or risk an increased chance of heart problems later in life.

Cynicism, anger, and negative attitude can lead you to develop heart diseases, a study found. A constant negative response to any stressful situation can cause weakened heart health.

Stressful situations initiate what is known as ‘fight or flight response.’ However, repeated similar situation mellows down this usually exciting pump of adrenaline through the body; thus, becoming normal with time.

However, sceptical or cynical people tend to experience high-stress levels every single time, again and again, stressing the body more than regular people. According to the author of the study, it is bad for the heart because “it places increased strain on our cardiovascular system over time.”

Past studies have shown how psychological stress can lead to physiological manifestations such as heart disease.

The research team from USA observed three hostile responses: emotional, behavioural, and cognitive. “'Cynical hostility... consists of negative beliefs, thoughts and attitudes about other people's motives, intentions and trustworthiness,” said author Alexandra Tyra from Baylor University in Texas.

She said cynical hostility tendency is not only harmful to short-term stress responses but also our long-term health. However, she added, this tendency is quite pervasive in our political climate.

Stress can be as damaging as obesity or consuming tobacco/alcohol, or even high cholesterol.

96 participants were observed in two lab sessions with an interval of seven weeks. The stress tests lasted for 15-20 minutes. A standard psychological test was performed to measure personality and temperament. Degrees of hostility and disposition towards cynicism and chronic hate were gauged.

One of the tests involved formulating a five-minute speech to defend oneself from accusations of transgression; a traffic violation or a charge of shoplifting.

“'These methods of social and self-evaluation are designed to increase the experience of stress and have been validated in prior research,” said the author.

Turn that frown upside down or risk an increased chance of heart problems later in life.

Cynicism, anger, and negative attitude can lead you to develop heart diseases, a study found. A constant negative response to any stressful situation can cause weakened heart health.

Stressful situations initiate what is known as ‘fight or flight response.’ However, repeated similar situation mellows down this usually exciting pump of adrenaline through the body; thus, becoming normal with time. However, sceptical or cynical people tend to experience high-stress levels every single time, again and again, stressing the body more than regular people.

According to the author of the study, it is bad for the heart because “it places increased strain on our cardiovascular system over time.”

Past studies have shown how psychological stress can lead to physiological manifestations such as heart disease.

The research team from USA observed three hostile responses: emotional, behavioural, and cognitive. “'Cynical hostility... consists of negative beliefs, thoughts and attitudes about other people's motives, intentions and trustworthiness,” said author Alexandra Tyra from Baylor University in Texas.

She said cynical hostility tendency is not only harmful to short-term stress responses but also our long-term health. However, she added, this tendency is quite pervasive in our political climate.

Stress can be as damaging as obesity or consuming tobacco/alcohol, or even high cholesterol.

96 participants were observed in two lab sessions with an interval of seven weeks. The stress tests lasted for 15-20 minutes. A standard psychological test was performed to measure personality and temperament. Degrees of hostility and disposition towards cynicism and chronic hate were gauged.

One of the tests involved formulating a five-minute speech to defend oneself from accusations of transgression; a traffic violation or a charge of shoplifting.

“'These methods of social and self-evaluation are designed to increase the experience of stress and have been validated in prior research,” said the author.

Following this, a mental arithmetic test was given to the volunteers. Vitals were recorded every two minutes.

The results have been published in the journal psychophysiology with the title, “Cynical hostility relates to a lack of habituation of the cardiovascular response to repeated acute stress.”


Next Story
Loading...