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Is Coronavirus News Affecting Your Mental Health? Here’s the WHO Guideline

Representative image.

Representative image.

In an advisory, the WHO has established the guidelines of what it does.

Coronavirus certainly affects your physical health.

While some people may or may not show symptoms, the virus still triggers your immune system to fight it, that much is established.

But can Coronavirus, officially called COVID-19, affect your mental health?

If you ask the World Health Organization, the answer is certainly yes. And you don't even have to contract the disease to feel the effect.

In an advisory, the WHO has established the guidelines of how mental health can be affected by the current Coronavirus pandemic.

The document emphasizes on a lot of important points, the first being racism.

"COVID-19 has and is likely to affect people from many countries, in many geographical locations. Do not attach it to any ethnicity or nationality. Be empathetic to all those who are affected, in and from any country. People who are affected by Covid-19 have not done anything wrong, and they deserve our support, compassion and kindness."

The virus, whose origin were traced to a seafood market in China's Wuhan, led to a lot of racism, both online and offline, with people avoiding Asian super-marts and markets, and blatantly being racist to people of Asian origin.

It also mentions how you should avoid labeling people infected with the disease.

"Do not refer to people with the disease as “COVID-19 cases”, “victims” “COVID-19 families” or the “diseased”. They are “people who have COVID-19”, “people who are being treated for COVID19”, “people who are recovering from COVID-19” and after recovering from COVID-19 their life will go on with their jobs, families and loved ones. It is important to separate a person from having an identity defined by COVID-19, to reduce stigma."

The virus will pass. The stigma and the behavior meted out by people, may not.

Don't go overboard and read every single source on obscure websites and drive yourself into a state of paranoia: This isn't a conspiracy theory.

"Minimize watching, reading or listening to news that causes you to feel anxious or distressed; seek information only from trusted sources and mainly to take practical steps to prepare your plans and protect yourself and loved ones. Seek information updates at specific times during the day, once or twice. The sudden and near-constant stream of news reports about an outbreak can cause anyone to feel worried. Get the facts; not the rumors and misinformation."

Read the full guide on what to do to put your mental health first in times of Coronavirus.