Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
»
1-min read

It's so Hot in California that Mussels Are Getting Cooked in Their Shells

The shocking new development comes as years of research on marine and ocean health has focused of rising water temperatures due to global warming and its effects on marine life.

Trending Desk

Updated:July 1, 2019, 3:37 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
It's so Hot in California that Mussels Are Getting Cooked in Their Shells
The shocking new development comes as years of research on marine and ocean health has focused of rising water temperatures due to global warming and its effects on marine life.
Loading...

A record-breaking heat wave across California, in June, is causing the largest mussels deaths in at least 15 years in Bodega Head, a small headland on the northern California bay and across roughly 140 miles of coastline.

According to news published in The Guardian, Jackie Jackie , who is the marine reserve research coordinator there, scores of mussels have just roasted in their beds, their shells gaping and scorched and their meats cooked through.

Jackie says that the rock-bound mussels die-off could affect the rest of the seashore ecosystem as well.

Speaking to The Guardian, Jackie explained that since mussels are a foundation species, something akin to trees, they provide shelter and habitat for a lot of animals. Thus when the core habitat gets hit, it ripples throughout the rest of the system.

The shocking new development comes as years of research on marine and ocean health has focused of rising water temperatures due to global warming and its effects on marine life. Rising temperatures are seeing coral suffering, starfish melting and now shellfish breaking down.

While University of British Columbia biologist Christopher Harley had documented a similar event at Bodega Head in 2004, however, he and Jackie believe this one was probably bigger.

Incidentally, a Bodega Bay 60 mile north of San Francisco, is where Alfred Hitchcock’s environmental horror movie “The Birds” was filmed.

Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results