News18» News»Buzz»'Like an Awkward Yoga Pose': Gordon Ramsay Grating a Coconut With His Feet is the Most Desi Thing Ever
2-MIN READ

'Like an Awkward Yoga Pose': Gordon Ramsay Grating a Coconut With His Feet is the Most Desi Thing Ever

Screengrab of video from Twitter/@NationalGeographic.

Screengrab of video from Twitter/@NationalGeographic.

Gordon Ramsay loves India and its diverse culture, and had earlier mentioned that he would like to open a restaurant here one day.

India is known to the rest of the world for a lot of things: Spicy food and 'jugaad' are two of the top ones.

Internationally renowned chef, Gordon Ramsay may have had a taste of both already on his trip to India.

In a video snippet posted on Twitter by National Geographic, Ramsay is seen visiting a household in South India, where he is offered am Indian dish. As Ramsay eats the dish, he finds it "spicy" and can be seen wanting water, or in his typical wit, "A fire extinguisher."

The woman explains "There's a way to make it less spicy," and invited Ramsay to join her in the task of grating a coconut. For Indians, this may be something you've already seen: The women in your family positioning the coconut at the helm of a knife or grater and putting pressure on the shell of the coconut to move it around for easier grating.

Ramsay can be seen trying to mirror the woman's movements, finding it difficult, and mentioning that "It's like the most awkward yoga pose ever." He finally gives up, sits down and uses his hands to grate it instead.

Eventually, the spiciness of the dish he was eating was reduced with the addition of coconut milk.

Watch the clip below.

It's a little unclear whether the episode was shot before the pandemic struck, as both Ramsay and the people in the clip were without masks or any kind of protection, or whether it was shot after it - Ramsay had earlier been visiting Kerala and Coorg before the pandemic struck.

Gordon Ramsay loves India and its diverse culture, and had earlier mentioned that he would like to open a restaurant here one day.

"There are very few countries in the world that have such unique diverse flavours from north to south and then east to west. Every state, every region in India has its own speciality in food. I have been coming to India for so many years, and every time I explore something new. It's the love of local people that compels me to visit the country again and again. I really want to open my restaurant for the Indian people in India."

The Michelin-star chef was in Coorg, one of the most serene hill stations in South India, shooting for the second season of National Geographic's "Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted", before Covid-19 paralysed the world. He had cooked famous pandi curry for local women in Coorg. He also shot portions of the show in Kerala.

"The south is all about spices and it felt amazing to smell the fragrances of those masalas. It was an incredible experience visiting India this time. I shot with local female cooks. Trust me, they are far, far better than me. In fact, I was surprised to see how they were not sweating while cooking in such hot climate," he shared.