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Millennials Are Only Now Getting the Real Lyrics of 'Barbie Girl' and It's Peak 2021

Most Twitter users said they had been singing the part that says "undress me everywhere" as "and dress me everywhere". (Credits: YouTube/Aqua)

Most Twitter users said they had been singing the part that says "undress me everywhere" as "and dress me everywhere". (Credits: YouTube/Aqua)

Who knew 'Barbie Girl' was NSFW? Turns out, next to no one.

Late millennials belong to that weird age group that has been on the cusp of things considered old and new. While late Gen Z-ers may get to proudly claim that they never sang ‘I’m a Barbie girl, in the Barbie world’ as pre-teens, most millennials probably couldn’t. And now, the millennials have chanced upon something that has ruined their nostalgia about the past that little bit more: Barbie girl hadn’t been singing about the joys of getting her hair brushed and dressing up. In a tweet, a user of the microblogging platform has shared the real lyrics of Aqua’s 1997 song ‘Barbie Girl’, pointing out the line that we may have been getting slightly wrong for years. It goes: “You can brush my hair, undress me everywhere”. Who knew ‘Barbie Girl’ was NSFW? Turns out, next to no one.

https://twitter.com/shreemiverma/status/1432612630989090818

Most Twitter users said they had been singing the part that says “undress me everywhere” as “and dress me everywhere”. Check out their tweets below:

https://twitter.com/Memeghnad/status/1432967636145487872

https://twitter.com/iPGandhi/status/1432995317553713156

https://twitter.com/ObiWanManobi/status/1432672667727917058

https://twitter.com/vantaskigoli/status/1432656528788525070

From anecdotes of four-year-olds singing the song to it being sung by children at birthday parties, Twitter users shared their anecdotes. Some also explained why the lines were so commonly misheard and the song misinterpreted; one user said it could be because few children know the usage of the word “undress”.

https://twitter.com/lady_gabbar/status/1432645421587857410

https://twitter.com/ObiWanManobi/status/1432672667727917058

https://twitter.com/kranybaby/status/1432646601432911873

https://twitter.com/aNuSFW/status/1433026134183120899

https://twitter.com/AnantikaMehra/status/1432614083795120128

Released in 1997 by Danish-Norwegian dance-pop group Aqua, ‘Barbie Girl’ is typical material that millennials and early Gen Z would like to wax poetic about. After its release, the song had been a worldwide chart-topper, and in the UK, it continues to be one of the best-selling singles of all time. This is not the first time that ‘Barbie Girl’ is treading murky waters. The usage of “Blonde bimbo” drew a lawsuit from American toy manufacturing company Mattel, who sued MCA Records, claiming that the song had violated the Barbie trademark and turned Barbie into a sex object. The case had, however, been dismissed.

‘Barbie Girl’ joins a long list of commonly misheard songs. Only this year, a strange phenomenon regarding a song grabbed the internet’s attention. In the midst of Hindi songs as the backdrop, one popular song stuck out but with inaudible and incoherent lyrics. Only one word seemed to resonate with Indians who heard it, “permanent.” At the word, the bass drops and a shift in the plot of the video is also recorded. The only strange thing being, the song is actually Turkish, and the only recognizable word isn’t even ‘permanent.’ Searching ‘Permanent song’ on YouTube will throw up the results to what is the correct song: Turkish artist’s Isyan Tetick’s ‘Patlamaya Devam (Remix)’.

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first published:September 02, 2021, 11:13 IST