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'Musician Wren' Bird is Disappearing From Amazon Rainforest and Climate Change is to Blame

Screenshot from a video uploaded by 
Marco Cruz / YouTube.

Screenshot from a video uploaded by Marco Cruz / YouTube.

Experts believe that the decline in the number of this bird since the 1980s might be because of the changing climate conditions or because of the fact that the prey of Musician Wren is being killed off due to global climate change.

A new study has revealed that the bird Musician Wren, which is native to the Amazon rainforest, is disappearing from the lungs of the Earth.

The bird is seldom seen in the area which has not been infiltrated by humans.

The area has also not experienced deforestation as well, but still, there is a decline in the number of Musician Wren there, reported Daily Mail.

According to the research, Manaus – the area in the rainforest where the study has been conducted – now has a more dry and hotter climate as compared to the 1980s.

Experts believe that the decline in the number of this bird since the 1980s might be because of the changing climate conditions or because of the fact that the prey of Musician Wren is being killed off due to global climate change.

Louisiana State University’s professor Philip Stouffer, who is the author of this study, says, “What we think is happening is an erosion of biodiversity, a loss of some of the richness in a place where we would hope biodiversity can be maintained.”

He also said that if the animal patterns are changing without any major change in the landscape then it means that just preserving forests would not be enough to maintain the biodiversity of the Amazon rainforest.

This gradual reduction in the number of birds was first noticed by professor Philip and his students in 2008.

Speaking about the authenticity of their results, co-author of this study Stephen Midway said that the data has been collected over many years and the results are not a fluke.

The data has been collected for a period of 35 years starting from the 1980s and at 55 sites of the rainforest. The South American rainforest has many unique species of birds.

Another bird that has seen a decline is The Wing-banded Antbird. They are also dependent on insects for food that they find on the forest floor.


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