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NASA's Otherworldly Simulations Show How the Sun Will Set on Uranus

Screenshot from a video uploaded by NASA.

Screenshot from a video uploaded by NASA.

The simulations were created by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s planetary scientist Geronimo Villanueva, who ideated it while building a computer modeling tool for a possible future mission to Uranus.

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The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have formed a kaleidoscope to make us understand the sunsets on other planets.

The simulations were created by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s planetary scientist Geronimo Villanueva, who ideated it while building a computer modelling tool for a possible future mission to Uranus.

An official statement from NASA released this week mentioned that visiting Uranus around sunset would let a spectator see a palette of blues which turns to turquoise as a result of the sun dipping away below the horizon. "This blue-green color comes from the interaction of sunlight with the planet's atmosphere," the statement read.

As explained, the sunset is a phenomenon caused when a planet rotates away from the sun. During this time, "the light photons from the sun get scattered in different directions depending on the energy of the photons and the types of molecules in the atmospheres."

This variation in the light scattering results in a colorful palette for each planet during the sunset.

Here is a look at the video, where the white dot is the Sun, showing its movement during sunset.

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