1-MIN READ

No Time? The Universe Follows a Clock of Its Own, Find Scientists

Image for representation. Credits: Dark/Netflix.

Image for representation. Credits: Dark/Netflix.

The scientists believe that studying different mechanisms and combining them all together, including fundamental clocks, might prove helpful in formulating a new theory about the concept of time

Share this:

For a human, the smallest unit of time is a second.

However, it seems like the same does not stand true for the universe. According to a new study, scientists believe that the smallest length of time might be as tiny as a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second. It has been suggested that the universe might have a fundamental clock that might be ticking faster than expected.

According to a team of physicists, time might be the result of a physical process. The study was published in the Physics Review Letters on June 19, 2020.

When asked about what exactly can be defined as time, Martin Bojowald, a physicist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, told Live Science, “We don't know. We know that things change, and we describe that change in terms of time.”

In physics, time is described by two clashing theories. While quantum mechanics describes it as, “Time is just there. It’s fixed. It’s a background,” according to physicist Flaminia Giacomini of the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Canada. However, the general theory of relativity describes time in a different way altogether.

The scientists believe that studying different mechanisms and combining them all together, including fundamental clocks, might prove helpful in formulating a new theory about the concept of time.

Bojowald and his team have claimed that the ticks of two identically built atomic clocks would never be completely similar. This allows researchers to establish that time has a fundamental nature.

Next Story
Loading