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No Vybe-ing: Apple Shelves App That Promoted Partying in Pandemic

Representative image. (Photo: Telenor)

Representative image. (Photo: Telenor)

Apple shelves the Vybe together app that promoted private parties amidst the time of global pandemic, Covid-19. Tag lines of the app says Get your rebel on, Get your party on. The app's creators told The Verge that Apple was the one to take it off the App Store.

Apple has taken down an iPhone app called "Vybe Together" that promoted private parties during the Covid-19 pandemic.

However, the now-deleted FAQ page of Vybe Together had said it was designed to promote "small gatherings" rather than "big parties". The app that used the tagline "Get your rebel on. Get your party on," has also been banned on TikTok.

The app's creators told The Verge that Apple was the one to take it off the App Store. The app promoted "gatherings every weekend" including an upcoming New Year's Eve party in a TikTok video.

The Vybe Together app had only 25 ratings before being removed, and its Instagram page has under 1,000 followers. The app appears to have launched previously under the name Trendies, a name mentioned on its now largely empty Instagram page. Its Instagram account now contains a single text post, blown out of proportion by media.

"We DO NOT CONDONE LARGE GATHERINGS," it read.

Vybe Together's website also advertised a "Vybe House" for the 2021 Zamna Festival music event in Tulum, Mexico.

Vybe Together kept a low profile although it was mentioned in at least one invitation to a New York party in September.

Meanwhile, six months ago, Apple and Google introduced a new smartphone tool designed to notify people who might have been exposed to the coronavirus, without disclosing any personal information. But for the most part, Americans haven’t been all that interested. Fewer than half of U.S states and territories, 19 in total have made such technology widely available. And according to a data analysis by The Associated Press, the vast majority of Americans in such locations haven’t activated the tool. Data from 16 states, Guam and the District of Columbia shows that 8.1 million people had utilized the technology as of late November. That’s about one in 14 of the 110 million residents in those regions.

With inputs from AP