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‘Not Everyone is Happy All the Time’: Burger King Takes a Cheeky Jibe at Rival McDonald's

‘Not Everyone is Happy All the Time’: Burger King Takes a Cheeky Jibe at Rival McDonald's

Burger King has taken a potshot at its competitor McDonald’s for its ‘Happy Meals’ advertising slogan, while supporting a social cause.

A potshot at its competitor and support for a social cause.

Fast-food giant Burger King has teamed up with Mental Health America to release “Real Meals” in select cities(New York City, Los Angeles, Seattle, Austin, Texas and Miami) for a month to draw attention towards mental health issues and take a dig at rival McDonald’s for its ‘Happy Meals’ advertising slogan.

The Blue Meal (for when you’re feeling sad); Yaaas Meal (for when you’re extremely excited), Pissed Meal (for when you’re hungry), Salty Meal (when you’re sassy or combative), and DGAF Meal (when you don’t give a f**k) are all part of the boxed meals rolled by Burger King to mark the Mental Health Month.

They “strongly resemble its competitor’s iconic Happy Meals — but named after a range of less cheerful human emotions,” according to marketwatch.com.

Burger King has also released an unusual commercial on the subject.

"Not everybody wakes up happy," a young man says at the start of the video. "Sometimes you feel sad, scared, crappy. All I ask is that you let me feel my way."

The commercial shows a teenager being bullied at school; a young mother who's told she isn't old enough to raise her daughter; an angry woman yelling that she just told her boss "to go f--- himself," and a young man worrying about student loans.

The commercial closes with the words: "No one is happy all the time. And that's OK" as images of the different Real Meals flash on the screen.

Paul Gionfriddo, Mental Health America president and chief executive said they typically partner with organizations in the health sphere, such as insurance or pharmaceutical companies "who see this stuff every day.”

"For companies outside of this space putting this kind of value of messages about mental health - that for us is priceless," he told The Washington Post.