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Not Just Namaste, Here are Some Other Greetings from Around the World That are 'Coronavirus-proof'

While Indians have been busy gloating and preening over namaste, a Twitter user shed light on all the other forms of non-contact based greetings from across the world

While Indians have been busy gloating and preening over namaste, a Twitter user shed light on all the other forms of non-contact based greetings from across the world

Adab, Salam, bowing, Bao Quan li, are all uniquely South Asian firms of greetings that are just as good as namaste in keeping coronavirus at bay.

While the Coronavirus pandemic is having a negative impact on everything, from trade to education to livelihoods and even personal freedom, one thing seems to have benefited from the pandemic that has claimed over 4,000 lives so far- the Indian Namaste.

Among all things that have been negatively impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic, contact-based ways of greetings are perhaps the worst hit.

Many cultures include greetings and salutation traditions that involve touching or human contact of some form. Be it handshakes, hugs, hi-fives, touching elders' feet or kisses on the cheek by way of saying hell, the COVID-19 pandemic has sent all these forms of formerly popular greetings under the scanner.

Following fears that the virus may spread through physical contact with an affected person, many across the world have limited their physical contact with others and the effect can be seen in the way people are now greeting each other. And one type of greeting which is currently winning the world is the Indian way of saying hello with folded hands and a namaste.

But while Indians have been busy gloating and preening over namaste, a Twitter user shed light on all the other forms of non-contact based greetings from across the world which can ALSO be used to say hello.

"All for namaste. But it's not the only non-contact greeting," the user Peter Griffin wrote on Twitter. He further pointed out a number of ways to greet people that have been around for years and require zero contact.

Adaab/Salaam

A gesture used by South Asian Muslims, Adaab implies respect and politeness and is also something "uniquely Asian" as Griffin puts it. It requires one to raise their hand towards face, palm inwards, fingertips almost touching forehead and bow ever so slightly.

Salaam is yet another gesture popular with South Asian Muslims. It involves an Adab with a low bow. In some variations, it can also be said with the hand to one's heart.

Bowing

Many east Asian countries practice various forms of the bow or genuflection as a form of greeting. Bowing is specially popular in Japan where deep bows are considered a sign of respect. It is also popular as a gesture among European nobility.

If bows are too stiff for you, then try a curtsy? Curtsies can be described as a variant of the bow that can be used for more informal greetings. It involves bending a knee with the foot behind the other and a slight bow of the head and was initially designed as the female version of male genuflection. But since it's a pandemic, now would probably be a good time to break that little gender block.

Salute

Various forms of salute exist around the world and are popular as the only form of salutation among military ranks. There is also, as Griffin pointed out, the one-finger salute, the informal salute and others.

Bao Quan Li

The Chinese greeting involves wrapping one fist in another palm infront of one's chest and bowing slightly. Derived from tai-chi, this form of greeting is popular in martial arts but dire times call for sure measure.

Vulcan

And let's not forget that pop culture has also given us some gems that can replace contact based greetings. As another Twitter user Javed Anwer pointed out, the Vulcan symbol popularised by the film and tv franchise Star Trek as the greeting salutation of Captain Spock's home planet, was yet another alternative.

And if none of that works, one can just simply wave from a distance when they see an old friend and or avoid people altogether.

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