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One of the Ocean's Loudest Creatures is Getting Louder and Climate Change is to Blame for it: Study

Screenshot from video uploaded by Animalogic / YouTube.

Screenshot from video uploaded by Animalogic / YouTube.

The report published in 'Science Daily' added that the results of the experiment show that climate change could have a major impact on the soundscape of the ocean.

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New research has revealed that a small sea creature will get louder and more troublesome as the ocean continues to warm up.

The “snapping” shrimp or the pistol shrimp is smaller than 2 inches in length but is one of the loudest creatures in the ocean.

The shrimp closes its claw fast enough to generate a bubble that is louder than a bullet when it implodes, the report published in Science Daily revealed, adding the snap sound stuns its prey, giving the crab time to attack and feed on the catch.

Although this sound is one of the most common sounds under the sea, it is getting louder as the temperature is getting higher, researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have found.

Aran Mooney and Ashlee Lillis listened to the shrimp sounds at different temperatures and found that the snapping shrimp let out louder and more frequent sounds as water temperatures rose, Mashable India reported.

The report added that the results of the experiment show that climate change could have a major impact on the soundscape of the ocean.

The findings of the study will be presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting in San Diego later this week.

As the seas are getting louder with water getting warmer, increased volume can affect an ecosystem in various ways. According to the researchers, it will mask sounds of the reef, as animals look for food or avoid predators.

Mooney said that even though reefs might appear quiet to humans, “when recorded with underwater microphones, it's a bustling place.”

The increase in sound may also hinder human activities such as detecting fish and clearing underwater mines. Whales, which communicate with each other across long distances, might also get affected, the study found.

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