News18»Buzz
1-MIN READ

Pet Cat Chases Away Fully Grown Elephant That Tried to Enter its Human's Yard in Thailand

A three-year-old pet cat chased away a fully grown elephant after it foraged into the feline's garden in Thailand | Image credit: YouTube

A three-year-old pet cat chased away a fully grown elephant after it foraged into the feline's garden in Thailand | Image credit: YouTube

The incident happened in Thailand’s Nakhon Nayok area, where the three-year-old cat named Simba was aggravated when a four-tonne jumbo tried to raid its home for some grub.

It may be a bit surprising to know that cats are very territorial, much more than dogs. The aggression kicks in when they feel someone has intruded in their territory. They include chase and ambush tactics to quell the intrusion by making hissing sounds and employ swatting when contact occurs.

In one such incident of not so aggressive proportions, a pet cat was successful in chasing away an elephant that wandered into its garden looking for food. The pet defence happened in Thailand’s Nakhon Nayok area, where the three-year-old moggy named Simba was aggravated when a four-tonne jumbo tried to raid its home for some grub. However, the ferocious feline stood its ground and was not intimidated by the enormous elephant.

The moggy, despite being very small in size, was pictured chasing away the jumbo by its owner. In the photo, the cat-faced off with the wild elephant’s intrusion, which took its heels and fled from the home garden.

According to residents, the elephant named Pai Salick is a known prankster and has a history of home intrusions in the neighbourhood in search of food. The 35-year old pachyderm lives in the nearby forest but often emerges from its hideout and walks around the homes at night looking for food and people know him, local park ranger Amnat Norasin said.

The house owner said, his cat is very territorial and doesn’t like the presence of other animals in its area.

The funny incident is not the only one as there is a serious human-wildlife conflict that springs up from time to time as the elephants wander into the farm lands to gather food. The elephant, which also happens to be Thailand’s national animal, is a protected species. Killing or harming them carry a maximum prison term of up to three years and a fine of 1,000 baht (approx. Rs 2,442).

An estimated 2,000 elephants survive in the wild jungles of Thailand with a similar number in captivity. They keep roaming through the deep jungles and in the nation’s several protected national parks.


Next Story
Loading...