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Snaking In: A Giant Python Creeps Into Bathroom as Children are Brushing Teeth

Snaking In: A Giant Python Creeps Into Bathroom as Children are Brushing Teeth

The reptile was later rescued by a local service.

In yet another instance of snakes showing up in the most unlikely of places in Australia, a huge python found its way into the bathroom of a Queensland family, leaving two children horrified as they were brushing their teeth and getting ready for bed.

The 5-foot-long carpet python had slithered into the home through a missing light-bulb fitting in the bathroom ceiling on Monday, The Sun UK reported.

Snake catcher Bryce Lockett who was called to remove the carpet python said the reptile “must have slithered down to enjoy the heat of the lamp.”

“I’ve been catching snakes for about seven years now, I’ve seen them all in various situations,” he was quoted as saying.

He said unlike most people, he was not terrified of snakes.

“I’ve owned snakes my whole life so I’m not too fazed,” he said.

“Carpet pythons are nocturnal and coldblooded, which is why this one- they’re harmless but they don’t like to be disturbed.”

The python was eventually released into a nearby creek by Bryce, according to The Sun.

Last month, a group of pool players in Australia were shocked to find a massive carpet python hiding in the corner pocket of a pool table.

The incident was reported by Brisbane Snake Catchers who said they were called to a home in Queensland after the players realized that they were “playing a game of pool with a friendly carpet python.”

The snake was seen popping its head out from a pocket of the pool table, with a “cheeky grin” on its face,.

Also in July, another family in Australia was shocked to find a huge carpet python soaking in the sun at their home in Queensland.

The reptile was later rescued by a local service.

Brisbane Snake Catchers said carpet pythons were coming into homes in search of warmth at this time of year.

“Generally speaking, it’s of no concern (and) they do more good than harm, and we often recommend leaving them be and coexisting with them,” they had said.

Bryce said “one in three people” in Australia have snakes lurking in their roofs.


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