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Rare Brain-Eating Amoeba Case Reported in the US, Here's What the Infection Does to You

Image credits: CDC / YouTube.

Image credits: CDC / YouTube.

Naegleria fowleri is known for infecting the brain tissues. The disease is commonly called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). These microbes are found in warm freshwater and enter the body through the nose and travel up to the brain and the spinal cord.

The United States of America (USA), much like the world, has been dealing with the deadly novel coronavirus for months. But now the country has a new issue to worry about and it is equally fatal.

The Health Department of Florida has issued a new advisory regarding the presence of Naegleria fowleri or the brain-eating amoeba.

Confirming a new case of the microscopic single-celled amoeba, the DOH stated that a person has contracted Naegleria fowleri in Hillsborough County.

Naegleria fowleri is known for infecting the brain tissues. The disease is commonly called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). These microbes are found in warm freshwater and enter the body through the nose and travel up to the brain and the spinal cord.

Some of the initial symptoms of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis include headache, fever, nausea, vomiting and stiff neck.

As the amoeba starts to attack the brain tissue, one can also experience confusion, lack of attention, loss of bodily control, seizures and hallucinations.

To keep themselves safe, the DOH has advised people to avoid swimming in freshwater sources like lakes, especially when the water is warm.

The notice also mentioned that there have been only 37 reported cases of the amoeba in Florida since 1962.

According to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only four people in the US out of 145 have survived brain-eating amoeba infection from 1962 to 2018.

The DOH advised, "Adverse health effects on humans can be prevented by avoiding nasal contact with the waters, since the amoeba enters through nasal passages."