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Researchers Design a New device That Can Clean Contaminated Water With Sunshine

Representative image / News18.

Representative image / News18.

To create the new device, the team used a super-light-absorbing (SWSA) aluminium surface, known for solar-based water sanitation. The surface carries water uphill, working against gravity, thus purifying the contaminated water.

Water is one of the essential elements of the Earth, and it is essential for us to get clean water for drinking and doing other household chores.

However, as the population across the Earth increases, the natural resources are being consumed in larger amounts.

To deal with the issue of clean water, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester and the US Army is working to develop a new solar technology to clean the contaminated water.

The new research was published in the journal Nature Sustainability and described the functioning of the aluminium panel device.

To create the new device, the team used a super-light-absorbing (SWSA) aluminium surface, known for solar-based water sanitation. The surface carries water uphill, working against gravity, thus purifying the contaminated water.

The device is used by dipping the solar panel in the water at a certain angle facing the sun.

The aluminium surface draws a thin film of water upwards. In the process, the blackened surface heats the water absorbed from the sun and changes the intermolecular bonds of the water. The evaporated water, without the contamination, is then collected into another transparent and cleaned container kept for condensation.

The efficient evaporation of the water helps in reducing the presence of unwanted contaminants, including urine, heavy metals and dyes. The research paper also claimed that the evaporation rates of this new device are 100 per cent more than an ideal device.

Chunlei Guo, the lead author of the study from the University of Rochester, said, "This is a simple, durable, inexpensive way to address the global water crisis, especially in developing nations."