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Sandwich Wrapper Found Intact in Scotland After 29 Years Proves Plastic is Going Nowhere

Mar Lodge Estate / Facebook.

Mar Lodge Estate / Facebook.

In a recent Facebook post shared by Mar Lodge Estate, a property of National Trust for Scotland, viewers got to see a sandwich wrapper from 1992 that still exhibited no sign of degradation.

It is no secret that plastic is non-biodegradable and a recent discovery of a sandwich wrapper from Scotland’s Cairngorms National Park has just shown how long it can last. In a recent Facebook post shared by Mar Lodge Estate, a property of National Trust for Scotland, viewers got to see a sandwich wrapper from 1992 that still exhibited no sign of degradation. The discovery of the wrapper was made during a clean-up drive in the area. The wrapper even had its printed details intact, which read that it contained a ham and tomato sandwich. The snack is made from malted bread, sliced ham, sliced tomato and margarine. The label further mentioned that the sandwich cost £1.09 and had an expiration date of March 23, 1992, making it more than 29 years old.

Captioning the picture, Mar Lodge Estate wrote that they found the sandwich wrapper under a rock on the estate. They further wrote that even after twenty-nine years, the plastic is very much intact and used the opportunity to tell people that plastic does not biodegrade and stays in the landscape for a very long time. Talking about their locality and the beauty that it tries to preserve, Mar Lodge Estate wrote that they are “a very special and beautiful place”. Hence, they requested people to follow the Scottish Outdoor Access code when visiting the area and act responsibly and take all the litter home.

With over 4k shares since it was first posted on Facebook earlier this week, many netizens have shared their reactions to the post. One user talked about their own experience of discovering vintage plastic wrapper as they wrote, “I dug up the wrapper of a lion bar from the 80s while digging in a client's garden once, it was shockingly well preserved.”

Another pointed out how the habit of littering should be controlled to maintain a place’s beauty, “I was recently on the Isle of Wight. I didn’t see any litter anywhere and covered at least 2/3 of the island. It all comes down to respect and clearly some people don’t respect where they live or visit.”

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