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School Teacher Discovers Pottery Pieces in Tamil Nadu with Inscriptions Similar to Indus Valley Artefacts

Indus Valley artefacts | Image for representation | Credit: Reuters

Indus Valley artefacts | Image for representation | Credit: Reuters

The discovery was made in Mariyapuram and Uthirakosamangai in the Ramanathapuram district where K Muniasamy and may have an important impact on India's archaeological history.

In what may be an important discovery for Indian archaeology, a government school teacher has discovered remnants of pottery in Tamil Nadu with inscriptions similar to those excavated from the Indus Valley civilization.

The discovery was made in Mariyapuram and Uthirakosamangai in the Ramanathapuram district where K Muniasamy, who teaches at a government school in Velanur and takes a keen interest in archaeology and was part of a team of excavators. He and the team together discovered several shards of pottery near a tank in Mariyapuram’s excavation site. As many as 20 of these potsherds contained inscriptions, Times of India reported.

According to Muniasamy, many of the red, and red and black potsherds contained symbols similar to those used to depict certain numbers by the Indus Valley civilisation.

This is not the first archaeological discovery made by Muniasamy. He has previously excavated potsherds with Chinese symbols on them and also depictions of tridents on pieces dating back to the Sethupathi period. The teacher often takes his students out for archaeological excavations.

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Muniawamy’s discovery comes after archeologists discovered graffiti and artifacts similar to the ones found in Indus Valley along the Vaigai river. The discoveries made at the Keezhadi excavations in Tamil Nadu’s Sivaganga district shed light in Tamil Nadu’s links and connectivity to the Indus Valley Civilisation. The artifacts, discovered at Keezhadi, include graffiti marks similar to the ones found in Indus Valley.

The findings also strengthen arguments put forth by some researchers and scholars that Tamils may have descended from the Indus Valley civilisation as it ended in the North and its members moved south.

According to the team of researchers who excavated the finds, the artifacts also date back to the ancient Tamil-Brahmi script to as far back as the 6th century BCE, meaning those during the Tamil Sangam tradition were expressing in writing as far back as the 6th century.

Despite efforts by archaeologists and experts across the world, the Indus Valley Script has not yet been decifered.

first published:March 15, 2021, 18:59 IST