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Scientists Develop Innovative Bandages That Can be Sprayed Directly on Wounds

Electrospinning is the process of creating such pray-on bandages that create a thin layer of fiber when sprayed onto damaged or broken skin.

News18.com

Updated:November 13, 2019, 1:22 PM IST
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Scientists Develop Innovative Bandages That Can be Sprayed Directly on Wounds
Image for representation

Scientists in the US have come up with a new innovative "spray-on" bandages to treat wounds. These bandages could help save lives and provide critical drugs and care to patients in remote and far-flung places.

Electrospinning is the process of creating such pray-on bandages that create a thin layer of fiber when sprayed onto damaged or broken skin. The process that looks a lot like spray painting a crack on the wall, could be revolutionary as it delivers drugs (contained in the fiber) directly to wounds.

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(Image credit: MTU)

This is the first time that such an innovation has been tested. Lead author of the study, Lane Huston said that by applying this spray paint-like mechanism, the "device can be used to cover wounds and provide controlled drug release over time", Daily Mail reported.

While electrospinning to develop polymer fibers was widely used for industrial purposes, the process requires high voltage. This is why it was previously considered to dangerous for human skin. The new study, however, published in the Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology, proved that the process could indeed be used to treat skin wounds.

According to the study, researchers at the Montana Technology University developed an electrospinning device with a smaller electric field that would not damage the skin while delivering the bandage on a wound.

“The bandage material, as well as the drug used, can be chosen on demand as the situation warrants, making modular and adaptable drug delivery accessible in remote locations,” Huston said.

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