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Scientists Discover 'Godzilla Wasp' that Can Dive Under Water to Catch Prey

Image for representation.

Image for representation.

The scientific name of the insect has been christened Microgaster Godzilla. It appears to hunt for aquatic caterpillar hiding inside algae and plants.

As if flying insects that can sting are not scary enough, a newly discovered species of wasps has been found to swim underwater as well.

Experts have very rightly named the new Japanese insect as “Godzilla wasp” for the similarities it bears with the science-fiction legend, Godzilla as it emerges from the water. The scientific name of the insect has been christened Microgaster Godzilla. It appears to hunt for aquatic caterpillar hiding inside algae and plants. When the wasp spots a potential prey, it simply dives underwater and attacks it from beneath. The caterpillar lives inside a protective case but cannot survive this attack from behind. The wasp can survive fully submerged for seconds as it wrestles with larvae and forces it out of the shell. As the caterpillar is exposed, the wasp inserts its parasitic larvae onto the flesh of the prey. There, the eggs are safe, growing as they eat the caterpillar from the inside, ultimately hatching after devouring their food source.

Wasps are generally aquaphobes and will not go even near water. However, two species are formerly known to be associated with water. But none have been known to knowingly dive underwater and completely submerge in an act like this. The event has also been caught on video.

According to Dailymail, more “murder hornets” have been discovered in the state of Washington. Experts believe they are nesting around the agricultural area.

Coming back to the “Godzilla” name, Dr. Jose Fernandez-Triana from the Canadian National Collection of insects in Ottawa say it’s for very interesting reasons.

“'First, being a Japanese species, it respectfully honours Godzilla, a fictional monster (kaiju) that became an icon after the 1954 Japanese film of the same name and many remakes afterwards,” he said and added how it is now one of the most recognisable symbols of Japan globally. The second reason, he stated, was how the wasp’s behaviour was so similar to the fictional character. It also suddenly emerged from the water and parasites the host, like Godzilla suddenly emerged out of the water in the films. Third, is more literal relation. “Godzilla has sometimes been associated, albeit in different ways, with Mothra, another kaiju that is typically portrayed as a larva (caterpillar) or an adult moth,” he said. He lastly added, that is it also fun!


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