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Scientists Rediscover Lost Planet 'NGTS-11b' as Search For Another Habitable World is Still On

Representative Image. (NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech)

Representative Image. (NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech)

The planet named NGTS-11b was originally detected two years ago with the help of NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) telescope.

Scientists have discovered a lost planet making use of technique used for spotting exoplanets. The planet named NGTS-11b was originally detected two years ago with the help of NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) telescope.

NGTS-11b was found by scientists from the University of Warwick in the UK using the telescopes at the Next-Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) in Chile.

In 2018 too, it was observed by the Warwick-led team.

The planet went missing after it was discovered first time because TESS telescope scans a major portion of the sky for only 27 days.

TESS relies on the transit method to notice the planet. Due to its short period of scanning, many of the longer period planets only passes once in the telescope’s data.

According to the university's website, NGTS-11b revolves a star which is positioned 620 light-years away.

The rediscovered planet has its size and mass equivalent to Saturn. Its orbit is of 35 days.

The scientists revealed that the spotting of NGTS-11b could pave the way for the discovery of a world within the habitable ‘Goldilocks zone’ in a distant solar system.

The study, which has been published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, was conducted by a team led by Dr Samuel Gill from the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick.

“These discoveries are rare but important, since they allow us to find longer period planets than other astronomers are finding. Longer period planets are cooler, more like the planets in our own Solar System,” said Gill.

The researchers divulged that the planet has a temperature of only 160°C, cooler than Venus and Mercury.