1-MIN READ

Seeds from Newton's Apple Tree Are Being Used to Grow a New One at His England Home

Photo: Flickr

Photo: Flickr

Almost 330 years later, pips of the same apple tree are being used to grow a new tree in Rosliston, United Kingdom.

Share this:

The apple tree under which Issac Newton discovered gravity has attained cult status. Almost 330 years later, pips of the same apple tree are being used to grow a new tree in Rosliston, United Kingdom.

However, the location where trees are being nurtured in Rosliston remains unknown, reported Derbyshire Live.

The pips, which were also blasted off to space with astronaut Tim Peake, have been accorded to Rosliston Forestry Centre.

Tim Peake, a European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut, was a part of the 2015 Principia mission, named after Newton’s great work, the Principia Mathematica, published in 1687.

During the mission, the pips were taken to the International Space Station, where it spent six months floating in micro-gravity. Upon returning to Earth in 2016, the seeds were sent to Sussex wild botanical garden Wakehurst, where they were kept for 90 days at 5 degree Celsius to make them sprout again.

The seeds were warmed at 15 degree Celsius in the summer of 2017, which resulted in emerging of the seedlings.

The trees were unique, Derbyshire Live quoted Tim Peake as saying. He also said that he wanted his mission to the space in 2015 to encourage others, particularly young people. He hoped that trees grown from the seeds of iconic apple tree would continue to inspire “potential Newtons”.

 


Share this:
Next Story
corona virus btn
corona virus btn
Loading