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Smoke From the Australian Bushfire to Make a Full Circle Around the Earth, Says NASA

The smoke had travelled halfway around Earth, crossing South America, turning the skies hazy and causing colorful sunrises and sunsets, on January 8th, said NASA.

Raka Mukherjee | News18.com@RakaMukherjeee

Updated:January 15, 2020, 8:32 AM IST
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Smoke From the Australian Bushfire to Make a Full Circle Around the Earth, Says NASA
Image credits: Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters.

The smoke emitted from the Australian bushfire, is set to make a 'full circuit' around the earth and return to Australia, says NASA.

In a statement released by NASA along with footage of the path of the bushfires, NASA stated that "the smoke had travelled halfway around Earth, crossing South America, turning the skies hazy and causing colorful sunrises and sunsets," on January 8th

They added that, "The smoke is expected to make at least one full circuit around the globe, returning once again to the skies over Australia."

NASA's Godardd, which uses NASA instruments detect actively burning fires, track the transport of smoke from fires, provide information for fire management, and map the extent of changes to ecosystems, found that the recent blazes from the bushfires had been so intense that they produced an "unusually large" number of pyrocumulonimbus events - or fire-generated thunderstorms.

The smoke from the fires which reached the stratosphere had even recorded a height of 17.7 km.

"Once in the stratosphere, the smoke can travel thousands of miles from its source, affecting atmospheric conditions globally," the statement added.

The Australian bushfires so far has destroyed more than than 11 million hectares right after the hottest and driest calendar year on record in Australia. So far, millions of animals have been reported dead, endangered and over 28 people killed, and left thousands of homes destroyed.

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