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South Pole is Warming Three Times Faster Than the Rest of the Earth: Study

Image for representation. Credits: Greenpeace.

Image for representation. Credits: Greenpeace.

Researchers have argued that human made climate change has worked together with the natural shifts to bring about one of the strongest warming trends on the planet.

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A new study has found that the South Pole has been warming up nearly three times more than the rest of the earth. Antarctica’s interior has been found to have faced the most drastic climate shifts over the last 30 years and scientists think these abrupt changes are going to continue.

However, these changes are not the result of the natural climatic variability alone. Researchers have argued that human made climate change has worked together with the natural shifts to bring about one of the strongest warming trends on the planet.

The study was recently published in Nature Climate Change journal.

Kyle Clem, the lead researcher of the paper wrote for The Guardian that although the South Pole records average temperatures in between -60 degree C in winters to -20 degree C in the summers; it is not immune to warming.

Their study has shown that the south pole has warmed by 1.8 degree C between 1989 and 2018. Here, the change came more rapidly from the start of the 2000s. During the same period, on the other hand, the warming in West Antarctica had suddenly stopped and the Antarctic Peninsula had even begun cooling.

Clem writes that this is because of “stronger” low-pressure systems and “stormier weather” on the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in the Weddell Sea. Thus with clockwise flow around these low pressure areas, warm and moist air has been transported to the Antarctic plateau.

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