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Storm Francis Unearths Wooodland Remains Along Welsh Coast Buried 4,500 Years Ago

The fossilised remains are presumed to be over 4,500 years ago. (Credit: Youtube/Getty Images)

The fossilised remains are presumed to be over 4,500 years ago. (Credit: Youtube/Getty Images)

The ancient forest was reportedly buried underneath sand, peat and saltwater some 4,500 years ago and parts of it were earlier seen on Borth's beach near Ceredigion, which is 21kms north of the the present site at Llanrhystud.

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Buzz Staff

Storm Francis, that battered parts of Wales in August this year, has caused considerable damage to hundreds of homes in the north.

As Wales weathered the violent gusts and the storm hit the west coast near Llanrhystud, water and wind peeled away debris and left open vast areas of fossilized trees which have been presumed to be from the Cantre'r Gwaelod forest, that has long been associated with the local legend of the mythical Sunken Kingdom of Wales, a Daily Mail UK report said.

The ancient forest was reportedly buried underneath sand, peat, and saltwater around 4,500 years ago and parts of it were earlier seen on Borth's beach near Ceredigion, which is 21kms north of the present site at Llanrhystud.

The trees that have been discovered include pine, alder, oak and birch and have been presumed to have stopped growing when the sea levels rose in the area, thus drowning the vegetation.

After the storm, now researchers are all set to carry on tests at the Llanrhystud site to determine its age.

Earlier in May and last year, Storm Hannah had unearthed furthermore of the petrified woodlands.

A joint research project between groups in Wales and Ireland consider the new discoveries both fascinating and worrying. Dr Hywel Griffiths from Aberystwyth University, who is a part of the research group was quoted by the Daily Mail as saying that the additional evidence of these climate change processes is worrying as these landscape changes are taking more often now and can cause an adverse effect on the environment.

Carbon dating of the remains of the tree stumps has placed the forest as having been around 1,500 BC.

Dubbed as the 'Atlantis of Wales', the legend says the land was once fertile and had a thriving town along the coastline.

There are various versions to the Cantre’r Gwaelod's destruction and the most common folklore associated with is that it was lost to the sea floods when Mererid, a priestess a fairy well couldn't do her duty and allowed the water to overflow, thus drowning the woodland.


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