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1-min read

Storm Hannah Reveals Prehistoric Forest in UK Beach, Hidden from Sight for 4 Millennia

The newly-revealed forest is being associated with a 17th Century myth of a sunken civilization known as 'Cantre'r Gwaelod', or the 'Sunken Hundred'.

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Updated:May 29, 2019, 1:26 PM IST
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Storm Hannah Reveals Prehistoric Forest in UK Beach, Hidden from Sight for 4 Millennia
Remains of what's believed to the 'Sunken Forest', dating back over 4 millennia | Image credit: Twitter
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A powerful storm has unveiled a prehistoric forest with hundreds of trees, buried under water and sand for more than four millennia.

Storm Hannah lashed the shore between Ynyslas and Borth in Ceredigion County of Wales, revealing

ancient peat-covered tree remains that had been buried under water and sand for over 4,500 years, BBC reported. The rediscovered forest is being referred to as the "Forest of Borth".

The newly-revealed forest is being associated with a 17th Century myth of a sunken civilization known as 'Cantre'r Gwaelod', or the 'Sunken Hundred'. In any case, archaeologists believe that the forest belongs to the Bronze Age.

Some locals insist they can still hear the bells of a drowned church of Cantre’r Gwaelod on a quiet day. This is not the first time signs of the forest have been seen by archaeologists. In 2014, tree-stumps were seen in the area for the first time, Metro reported. However, locals soon reported that the beach quickly reclaimed the stumps.

It is believed the area was a once-fertile land and township protected by floodgates.

Legend has it that the lost land was called Maes Gwyddno (the land of Gwyddno), and was drowned when Mererid, the priestess of a fairy well, allowed the water to overflow.

The area is often referred to as the Atlantis of Wales owing to various archaeological discoveries that have been made there including fossilized human and animal footprints.

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