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Strange Looking Reptile with 'Broomstick-like' Neck Named after Mythical Greek Sea Monster

Weird 'broomstick' necked Triassic reptile.
(Image credit: Twitter)

Weird 'broomstick' necked Triassic reptile. (Image credit: Twitter)

As per researchers, both these animals with peculiar necks are not only rare but are also fairly inflexible.

In an incident, which can be regarded as absurd, a Triassic-aged sea monster with "a very long broomstick for a neck” and sharp curved teeth and a crocodile-like snout has been found.

According to a report published in Live Science, these creatures are of two types. It has now been ascertained that the larger of the two will be called Tanystropheus hydroides, a nod to the hydra. The long-necked mythical sea monster of Greek antiquity. The smaller one will have the preexisting name, Tanystropheus longobardicus.

As per researchers, both these animals with peculiar necks are not only rare but are also fairly inflexible. If the scientists are to be believed then hydroides longobardicus have sort of found a way to coexist. This happened around 242 million years ago.

Stephan Spiekman, a former doctoral student at the University of Zurich's Paleontological Institute and Museum in Switzerland, and also the lead researcher, said, “They had evolved to feed on different food sources with different skulls and teeth, but with the same long neck.”

As far as the discovery of this animal is concerned, it was first done in 1852. According to a then paleontologist, Francesco Bassani Tanystropheus was a flying reptile called a pterosaur. His theory was that the animal’s long hollow neck bones were actually finger bones that supported its wings. Later on, this theory was rejected as scientists figured out that the 20-foot-long reptile has a 10-foot-long neck that was three times the length of its torso.

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