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This Software Will Let You See the World through Different Animals' Eyes

Representative Image.
(Reuters)

Representative Image. (Reuters)

Study authors have revealed that it can be used with images taken by cameras and smartphones as well as scientific instruments, the report added.

While we have a certain way of observing our surroundings, have you ever wondered how the animal world perceives its milieu? Do they look at the world like the human eyes do; or is it vastly different from our visual capabilities? Scientists from the University of Queensland and a British team from the University of Exeter have now created a programme, which allows humans to look at the world through the eyes of different animals.

Daily Mail reported that researchers and other enthusiasts can try their hands on the software that is now available for free. Developers have, however, clarified that it is 'not like an Instagram filter,' the report added.

Study authors have revealed that it can be used with images taken by cameras and smartphones as well as scientific instruments, the report added.

The study was originally published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

Speaking about their programme, PhD candidate Cedric van den Berg from University of Queensland's School of Biological Sciences said that it is difficult for humans to understand animal perception, adding, "Most animals have completely different visual systems to humans, so—for many species—it is unclear how they see complex visual information or colour patterns in nature, and how this drives their behaviour," the report quoted him as saying.

The report further added that Cedric then led the project to create the software, which they named Quantitative Colour Pattern Analysis (QCPA).

Co-lead author Dr Jolyon Troscianko added that while it has been known for several years that understanding animal vision and signalling depends on combining colour and pattern information, available techniques were not implementable without certain key developments.

Dr Karen Cheney of the University of Queensland also added that the framework can be applied to a wide range of conditions and in a variety of habitats.

According to her, the framework allows people to investigate how a wide range of organisms like insects, birds and fish observe colour patterns in the surroundings, the report revealed.